Delivering low cost, high value practical events for planning and related disciplines

Past Events

Town Centre Planning

 Making a Difference

RICS Meeting Rooms, 125 Princes Street, Edinburgh

27 October 2016

 

 

 

Programme

 

 

1.00     

Registration and light lunch

     
1.30  

Welcome and Introduction from Chair

Nick Wright, Nick Wright Planning and RTPI Representative on External

Advisory Group - National Review of Town Centres, 2013

     
1.35  

Applying the Town Centre First Principle

Karl Doroszenko, Development Planning & Regeneration Manager, East

Ayrshire Council

     
1.55  

Town Centre Living - Bringing Empty Homes Back into Use

Gavin Leask, Empty Homes Local Project Manager, Shelter Scotland

     
2.15   Discussion
     
2.35   Tea/Coffee
     
2.55  

Targeted Initiatives:

A discussion of Simplified Planning Zones, Reducing Planning Obligations,

BIDs and Clustering of Payday Lending & Betting Shops

Sharon Marklow, Strategy & Place Manager, Renfrewshire Council

Alan Williamson, Team Leader, West Dunbartonshire Council

David Grove, Lead Officer, Town Centre Development, Fife Council

     
3.35   Discussion
     
3.55   Final Comments
     
4.00   Close

 

 

Background

February 2016 saw the publication of the 'Town Centre Action Plan - Two Years On',  providing a snapshot report on progress against the themes in the Town Centre Action Plan.  The Action Plan of 2013 introduced the Town Centre First Principle and a call for the health of town centres to be put at the heart of the decision-making process.  Two years on from the publication of Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) 2014 and the introduction of the town centre first principle into development plan policy, this event focuses on initiatives and interventions where the planning system has strived to make a difference and to support the viability of town centres.  Although the event concentrates mainly on planning interventions, its scope includes a wider range of initiatives and interests designed to reinvigorate Scotland's town centres.

 

Who Should Come

This event will be of value to planners, town centre practitioners and all with an interest in encouraging growth and promoting vitality in our town centres.

 

Where    

RICS Meeting Rooms, 125 Princess Street, Edinburgh, EH2 4AD

(about midway between Waverley and Haymarket Stations, on the tram and a number of bus routes)

When    

Thursday 27 October 2016

Registration and light Lunch 1.00 - Finish 4.00

Cost     £40
Enquiries/Booking   Joyce Hartley: 07896 058343: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS

1.   Karl Doroszenko

2.   Gavin Leask

3.   Alan Williamson

4.   Sharon Marklow

 

 

 

          

jhplanbrodies

 

Increasing Housing Supply

 

 Improving Outcome

110 Queen Street, Glasgow

Thursday 8 September 2016

  

Programme

 

 

1.00     

Registration and light lunch

     
1.30  

Welcome and Introduction from Chair

Alasdair Fleming, Partner, Real Estate, Brodies LLP 

     
1.35  

Working in Patnership

Fraser Carlin, Head of Planning & Housing Services, Renfrewshire Council 

     
1.55  

Effective Engagement with Communities

John Hamilton, CEO, Winchburgh Developments Ltd

     
2.15   Discussion
     
2.35   Tea/Coffee
     
2.55  

The 'ideal' DM Planner and Housebuilder Applicant

Jennifer Horn, Team Leader, Strategic Development and Regeneration, East Dunbartonshire Council

Andrew Trigger, Strategic Land Manager, Avant Homes

 

     
3.15  

A Legal View

Karen Hamilton, Partner, Brodies LLP

     
3.35   Discussion
     
3.50   Final comments from Chair and Close

 

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 Improving Processes and Delivery Mechanisms

110 Queen Street, Glasgow

Thursday 22 September 2016

 

 

Programme

 

 

1.00     

Registration and light lunch

     
1.30  

Welcome and Introduction from Chair

Neil Collar, Partner, Brodies LLP

 

     
1.35  

Increasing Effective Housing Land Supply

Tammy Adams, Head of Planning, Homes for Scotland

 

     
1.55  

Managing Major Housing Applications

Colin Lavety, Planning Director, Barton Willmore

 

     
2.15   Discussion
     
2.35   Tea/Coffee
     
2.55  

Increasing the Delivery of Housing, especially the Private Rented Sector

Ken Ross, CEO, Ross Developments & Renewables Ltd

     
3.15  

A Legal View

Neil Collar, Partner, Brodies LLP

     
3.35   Discussion
     
3.50   Final comments from Chair and Close

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Background


The Scottish Government has much to consider with the Planning Review, Land Reform, Community Empowerment and emerging new planning guidance on housing delivery and infrastructure. Whatever the outcomes, it is unlikely that significant change to the planning system and the way in which housing is delivered is going to happen any time soon. 

In the meantime, Government has given strong assurances that increasing housing delivery is a key priority with a commitment to deliver at least 50,000 affordable homes over the next five years. Yet despite increased activity, annual private sector completions remain well below pre-recession levels. 

Against this background, the complexities and often tortuous process of getting housing on the ground continue. For local authorities this means grappling with numbers, indentifying potential housing sites, assessing infrastructure requirements, dealing with local politics and addressing the concerns of local communities. Added factors for housebuilders include dealing with landowners, securing development funding and critical timing. The key role of the planning system to deliver good quality places is often out of kilter with the primary commericial drivers of the development industry for certainty, the most efficient use of land and early sales. The operational enviroment for all sides in the process is far from perfect and is likely to remain so for the forseeable future. 

These events are set largely in the context of exisiting legislation and guidance and look to identify practice that has resulted in improved outcomes and processes in terms of delivery of housing on the ground.

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 Who Should Come

This event will be of value to planners in the public and private sectors, developers, housebuilders and all with an involvement in the delivery of housing.

Where     Brodie's Offices at 110 Queen Street, Glasgow, G1 3BX

 

When    

Registration and light Lunch 1.00 - 1.30

Finish 3.50

Cost     These events are free to attend
Enquiries/Booking   Joyce Hartley: 07896 058343: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 SUPPORTED BY:

          

 

 

REFLECTIONS ON THE LDP PROCESS

sharing experience – promoting good practice

 

Wednesday 26 August 2015

 

Falkirk Business Hub, Vicar Street, Falkirk

Background:

With many Local Development Plans now complete or at an advanced stage of preparation, a considerable body of experience has built up to help inform the next round.

This event reflected on the collective experience of a number of practitioners and drew conclusions about how the process has worked and what might make it work better in the future.

Looking at the LDP process from their own perspective, speakers from a range of backgrounds addressed the following questions:

  • What worked well that we would want to replicate next time?
  • What didn’t go well and we’d want to do differently?
  • What did we not anticipate?
  • How will the environment be different next time?
  • How can we improve?
  • How can we improve if resources might be less?

 

Speaker Presentations

Alistair Shaw presentation here

Graeme Finlay presentation here

Andrew Fleming presentation here

 Clare Symonds presentation here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOUSING LAND

Reflections on Recent  Planning Policy and Practice

Edinburgh

Wednesday 4 March 2015

 

 

Picture1 JH logo

 

brodies

 

Background:

Despite a raft of measures aimed at supporting the housing market and prospective house buyers, the housing crisis shows no real sign of abating.   Whilst some local authority areas report a gradual rise in the number of annual completions, housing production in Scotland is still 40% lower than in 2007 - this against a background of record population levels and continuing growth in the number of households.

A number of recent high profile studies highlight the need for radical change in the way that housing land is procured including the need for greater transparency in the land market and the use of compulsory purchase.   Also highlighted is the need for wider choice, greater confidence for communities, the upfront provision of infrastructure and the critical role of design and placemaking. 

Against the background of a dysfunctional housing market in which multiple factors conspire to frustrate the delivery of housing, the planning system continues to attract often harsh criticism.

Whilst it seems that major change is inevitable, could the current planning framework do more to support the housing market?

This event explores a number of aspects of policy and practice affecting housing land including the implications of Scottish Planning Policy (particularly with regard to the presumption if favour of sustainable development); the concept of 'prematurity';  the outcome of development plan examinations; decisions made contrary to the development plan; and the relationship between SDPs and LDPs.

 

     

COMMUNITY GROWING, TEMPORARY GREENING

AND STALLED SPACES

(achieving better practice in the planning process)

Picture 4 IS

Picture1 JH logo

Star & Garter Hotel, Linlithgow

Wednesday 28 January 2015

Green infrastructure including space for community growing, allotments and temporary greening is becoming increasingly embedded into local development plans through national planning policy and the work of organisations such as Central Scotland Green Network Trust (CSGNT), Architecture and Design Scotland(A+DS) and the Grow Your Own Working Group.  There is now a wealth of information and guidance about factors such as leasing and legal matters, design, funding, training in horticultural skills, establishing community groups etc.  

Despite this continually expanding body of knowledge and an increasing number of community growing, temporary greening and other projects for 'stalled spaces', the planning system is still viewed by many groups as a major barrier to securing projects, mainly due to inconsistencies in the development management approach.  It has been reported that local authorities frequently have different views about whether or not planning permission is required for features such as huts and polytunnels and a range of other matters such as visual amenity, car parking, road access and change of use.

From development plan policies, through supplementary guidance, the use of planning obligations to secure growing space and the development management system, this event will look at issues that arise and how these are addressed, with a view to achieving better practice and greater consistency in the planning process.   

 

View programme here

John Glover presentation here

Heather Claridge presentation here

Peter Duncan presentation here

Karen Cadell presentation here

 

 

WHAT OUR DELEGATES SAID:

"Helpful to hear practices used by different councils in creating allotments"

 

"John Glover's presentation put everything in context and highlighted key issues"

 

"Heather's Claridge's presentation was inspirational"

 

"Peter Duncan's talk offered a lot of food for thought"

 

"Karen Cadell's talk illustrated a mindful and informed approach to incorporating growing space into design"  

HEAT MAPPING, HEAT NETWORKS AND PLANNING

sharing experience - promoting good practice

Star & Garter Hotel, Linlithgow

Tuesday 27 May 2014 

 

Background

The Scottish Government's aspirations for a Low Carbon Scotland include ambitious emissions reduction targets of 80% by 2050 and a world leading 42% by 2020. As well as contributing to overall climate change agenda, the move towards low carbon and renewable energy generation is part of a wider strategy to promote sustainable economic growth and address rising energy costs for households and industry.

In order to exploit opportunities for the more productive use of energy for heating and cooling, the Government is promoting the use of heat mapping in local developments plans (LDPs).

The planning system has a crucial role in helping to link the generation and distribution of energy with development and investment in supply chain facilities, and to this end Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) Review requires LDPs to use heat mapping and to support the development of heat networks. Whilst there are a number of notable successful  district heating schemes in existence already,  the use of heat mapping and the promotion of heat networks in LDPs remains relatively new.

The Scottish Government has developed a Heat Map for Scotland to help assess who needs heat (demand) and where the sources of heat (supply) might come from using a Geographic Information System (GIS).  These datasets are now available to local authorities to support local energy planning.

This afternoon event will explore current developments in the use of heat mapping in LDPs, the development of supporting planning policy and aspects of its implementation at  the local level.

View programme here

View speaker presentations here

View feasibility study for district and renewable energy options for buildings in and around Linlithgow Cross (made available by Transition Linlithgow) here

 

 

WHAT OUR DELEGATES SAID

"All presentations useful, informative and thought provoking.  Learnt a lot today!"

"All presentations very useful and will help Transition Linlithgow with its plans"

"Good variety of presentations covering all aspects from the strategic policy level to the practical implementation"

TOWN CENTRES - CHANGING POLICY AND PRACTICE
sharing experience - promoting good practice
 

Falkirk Business Hub, Vicar Street, Falkirk

Tuesday 13 May 2014

Background:

This event is set against the backdrop of the 2013 National Review of Town Centres - the 'Fraser Review' -  and the Scottish Government's response as set out in the subsequent Town Centre Action Plan released in November 2013.  The Action Plan promotes a 'town centre first principle' which encourages a shared understanding of the principle across the public sector and a range of cross-government measures aimed at facilitating actions to address current issues facing town centres.

This half-day event event offers an opportunity to hear about Scottish Government policy for town centres and a 'snapshot' of current thinking and practice across the public and private sectors aimed at fostering closer working relationships to enhance Scotland's town centres.

  

 

View programme here

View speaker presentations here

View letter from Sunil Varu, Chairman, Association for Town Centre Management Scotland  here

 

WHAT OUR DELEGATES SAID:

 

"Very good range of perspectives and ideas for our own use"

" All presentations useful and interesting"

" Good value for cost, comfortable and accessible venue and well managed"  

HOUSING LAND - SECURING A GENEROUS AND EFFECTIVE SUPPLY

sharing experience - promoting good practice
 

European Room, City Chambers, High Street, Edinburgh

Thursday 23 January 2014

 

 

Background:

There a number of factors which continue to affect the delivery of and demand for housing such as market uncertainty, lack of access to finance and issues surrounding development viability. However, the allocation of land for housing through the planning system is also a critical factor. Scottish Planning Policy (SPP) requires the planning system to identify a generous supply of land for the provision of a range of housing in the right places, and that a supply of effective land for at least 5 years should be maintained at all times.

Although local authorities may consider that their development plans provide for an effective and generous supply, there are those, mainly from the development sector who argue that many allocated sites remain constrained and incapable of delivery within specified timeframes.  There are concerns about a range of issues such as what constitutes a 'generous supply', the definition of 'effective', the role of the Housing Need and Demand Assessment, Local Housing Strategies, windfall sites, flexibility allowances, concerns about 'over allocation', providing allocations 'in the right place' and an increasing number of attempts to promote what are considered to be suitable sites through the development management process.

 

View programme here

View speaker presentations here

View Murray Shaw's paper 'Development Plans - Effective to Ensure an Effective Supply'  here

View Gwen McCracken's presentations notes here

 

 WHAT OUR DELEGATES SAID

 

"Excellent - hope for more!"

"All useful and relevant."

"Good balance of views and topics."

"Well organised"

DELIVERING INFRASTRUCTURE THROUGH THE PLANNING PROCESS
sharing experience - promoting good practice

Exchange Square, Edinburgh

Tuesday 23 October 2013

 

 

Ryden      

 

 

Background:

The development industry in general and the house building sector in particular, continues to operate against a background of shrinking public sector resources and private sector borrowing constraints. Within this context, the provision of infrastructure continues to present significant challenges, especially in areas where major growth strategies are being pursued and the more traditional methods of funding infrastructure through Section 69 and 75 planning obligations have become increasingly difficult.

This half day event brings together experienced practitioners from the public and private sectors to discuss alternative and innovative funding mechanisms and to explore ways in which the infrastructure required to support development strategies can continue to be funded through the planning process. The event offers an opportunity to hear about practical and effective approaches together with an assessment of key legal issues.

View programme here 

 View Speaker Presentations here

 

WHAT OUR DELEGATES SAID:

"All very interesting; good to get different perspectives on this topic."

"All very useful - good mix of experience , approaches and public/private sector mix."

"All excellent - good to have practical examples in each to support the theory/technical information."

"Excellent - very well organised."

" Great - venue and speakers.  Good time for event and format worked well".